wiki:cypress/BasicLinuxComands/Exercise

Version 8 (modified by cbaribault, 2 years ago) (diff)

Changed typo in Challenge section, since user has permission to copy vice move the file.

Basic Linux Commands Exercise

Let's put some of our new knowledge into practice by creating a new directory to house some files we'll be using throughout the day.

Goal: Create a subdirectory in your home directory

While logged into Cypress, make a new subdirectory in your home directory:

  • Navigate to your home directory by using the cd ~ command.
  • Check that you are in your home directory by using the pwd command.
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ cd ~
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ pwd
    /home/workshop/tuhpc002
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ 
    
  • Make a new subdirectory called "examples" using the mkdir command.
  • Check that the directory was created by using the ls command.
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ mkdir examples
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ ls
    examples
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ 
    

Next, let's move some files into our new directory

  • Move into the examples subdirectory using the cd command and the relative path directory examples
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 ~]$ cd examples/
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    
  • Now, check the contents of the directory "/lustre/project/workshop/textfiles" using the ls command and the absolute path directory (Hint, you can use the tab key to autocomplete partially typed commands)
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 textfiles]$ ls /lustre/project/workshop/textfiles/
    alphabet.txt  numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 textfiles]$ 
    
  • Copy the files to your current directory

Now, examine the contents of those files

  • Use the cat command to examine the content of the numbers.txt file
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ cat numbers.txt 
    01
    02
    03
    04
    05
    06
    07
    08
    09
    10
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    
  • Use the tail command to list the last 4 lines of the numbers.txt file
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ tail -4 numbers.txt
    07
    08
    09
    10
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$
    
  • Invoke the head command to list the first 5 lines of the alphabet.txt file
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ head -5 alphabet.txt
    a
    b
    c
    d
    e
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    

Lastly, let's practice copying, moving, and removing files

  • Copy the contents of the textfiles directory to your examples directory using the cp command
  • Use the ls command to ensure that you've transferred the correct files to the correct directory
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ cp /lustre/project/workshop/textfiles/alphabet.txt alphabet.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ cp /lustre/project/workshop/textfiles/numbers.txt numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ ls
    alphabet.txt  numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    
  • Create a backup of the "numbers.txt" file named "numbers_backup.txt" using the cp command.
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ cp numbers.txt numbers_backup.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ ls
    alphabet.txt  numbers_backup.txt  numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    
  • Remove the original "numbers.txt" file using the rm command
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ ls 
    alphabet.txt  numbers_backup.txt  numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ rm numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ ls
    alphabet.txt  numbers_backup.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    
  • rename the backup file "numbers.txt" using the mv command
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ ls
    alphabet.txt  numbers_backup.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ mv numbers_backup.txt numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ ls
    alphabet.txt  numbers.txt
    [tuhpc002@cypress1 examples]$ 
    

Challenge

  • Copy the file /lustre/project/workshop/animals to your home directory
  • Create two new subdirectories in your home directory called "letters" and "digits".
  • Move the alphabet.txt file to the letters directory and the numbers.txt file to the digits directory.
  • Lastly remove the examples directory from your home directory.

return to basic linux commands page